Law – Hunting

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All hunters need to have a license and report every kill they make to the local forest authorities and there should a  limit of a maximum number of animals, birds and other fauna that they are allowed to hunt in a year.

Hunting for sport or commercial gain should be abolished.

Hunting for food can be allowed in areas where the animal population is plentiful and limited to upto 10% of the required surplus of the plentiful animal population.

Hunting can also be allowed for excessive animal population declared as vermin and seriously affecting the livelihood of nearby farmers and agriculturists for at least 5 years.

Hunting for wildlife that have been declared vermin and more than 100% of the surplus population required can be done after permission is obtained from the forest department.

Hunting of pregnant females, nursing females and newborns upto 8 months old should not be allowed.

Assault weapons and semi automatic weapons should not be given permission for hunting.

Violators of this law should be fined at least Rs 1,00,000 for each illegal hunt or if they cannot pay, they should do 3 months hard labour upto a maximum of 9 months.

They should have their hunting license cancelled for 10 years.

However hunting for food can only be allowed for an individual for their and their immediate families personal use.

Other than the meat, all other byproducts of the animal like leather, antlers and head and other by products must be surrendered to the forest department.

People should be allowed to keep these byproducts only on approval from the forest department.

If they sell this meat for a sum of money, they must be made to pay 10 times the amount that they got for it or do 6 months of hard labour for each animal that they illegally profited from upto a maximum of 18 months punishment.

Those who buy these illegally hunted meat and animal products should pay a fine of 25 times the price that they paid for the illegal product or if they cannot pay, then for each kilo procured , they should do one month of hard labour upto a maximum of 3 months. .

Hunting should only be allowed for locals who live on land within a 10 km radius of the wildlife.  No foreigners and outsiders should be allowed to hunt unless authorised and approved by the forest department.

Hunting for wildlife that have been declared vermin and more than 100% of the surplus population required can be done after permission is obtained from the forest department.

In private farms, the State should allow commercial farming  of wild animals like deer, crocodiles and other wildlife species that are plentiful and can be multiplied rapidly.

People should be allowed to raise these plentiful wild animals like deer, wild fowl and peacocks on their private farms and sell them as pets or for meat, leather or other byproducts with strict monitoring and regulation of sale.

These farmers must be strictly regulated and report the source and sale of all such plentiful wild animals.

With RFID , GPS collars and DNA fingerprinting, any animal can be easily tracked and monitored.